NEWS

Mar 13, 2018 Dr. Yin Received SOT 2017 RDTSS Best Paper Award and Emily Measel received Pfizer SOT undergraduate student Travel Awards

Dr. Yu, Dr. Ping Xiao, XinYu Hong, Jacob Siracusa and Emily Measel attended the annual SOT meeting at San Antonia. Emliy had a platform presentation of her research on the molecular mechanism of multinuclear caused by BPAF. XinYu presented her poster on the mechanism of testicular toxicity caused by nanoparticles. Jacob presented his research on machine Learning-based High-Content Analysis to characterize phenotypes associated with the reproductive with toxicity of bisphenol A and its analogs. Congratulation !

indhy
indhy
indhy
indhy


Feb 11, 2018-Emily Measel, undergraduate student in our lab, Received Pfizer SOT Undergraduate Student Travel Awards for Her Excellent Research

Pfizer SOT Undergraduate Student Travel Awards recognize outstanding undergraduates who have not yet received their bachelor's degrees and are presenting research at the Annual Meeting. Emily Measel will give both a platform (Abstract Number: 3275) and a poster presentation during the annual SOT meeting at the San Antonia. Her title of presentation is "Bisphenol AF Induces Multinucleation in Mouse Spermatogonial Cells In Vitro". Congratulation!

Nov. 9, 2017 NIOSH Research Rounds: Single Lab Test Identifies Chemicals Toxic to Multiple Reproductive Cells

"An inexpensive, single laboratory test accurately and quickly identified chemicals toxic to three types of reproductive cells, according to a NIOSH-funded study conducted at the University of Georgia and published in the journal Toxicological Sciences. In today's workplace, workers may encounter increasing numbers of chemicals. With new chemicals come new safety regulations based on tests for chemical toxicity. Since existing tests are costly, time-consuming, and sometimes inaccurate, the demand is growing for new tests that are faster, cheaper, and more precise. In previous research, the group at the University of Georgia developed a cost-effective laboratory technique that uses testicular cells to identify which chemicals harm the male reproductive system. Looking specifically at BPA, or bisphenol A, and three related chemicals, they were able to identify which chemicals caused more damage to the cells tested. In this follow-up study, the scientists expanded their testing to include 32 chemicals selected by searching the scientific literature and other public sources. To test the reproductive toxicity of these chemicals, the scientists focused on three types of testicular cells:spermatogonial, Sertoli, and Leydig. All three types of cells are critical to sperm development and production, and damage to any of them can cause reproductive dysfunction." Read more


Sept 17, 2017 NIOSH Research Rounds: Cost-effective Test Developed for Reproductive Toxicity of Common Chemicals

"You may have heard about BPA, or bisphenol A, and concerns from consumers about exposure to BPA from plastic containers they purchase or have at home. While many products are now labeled "BPA-Free", workers who make these plastic containers may still face risks from the chemicals used in place of BPA. In the workplace, exposure to BPA and other chemicals occurs through inhalation, skin absorption, and eating and drinking. After studies tied BPA to reproductive and other disorders, about 10 years ago some manufacturers began using chemical substitutes for products that previously contained BPA. What remains unclear, however, is whether the chemical substitutes pose less of a risk to the reproductive system to exposed workers. The problem with existing tests is that they rely on expensive animal models. Now, a NIOSH-funded study at the University of Georgia has developed a cost-effective laboratory technique to identify which chemicals harm the male reproductive system. Unlike previous methods, the new mini-testis model does not use an animal model, but, rather, testicular cells, according to the paper published in The Journal of Toxicological Sciences and presented last month at the 10th World Congress on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Sciences in Seattle, Washington. Using this model, researchers were able to quickly perform multiple tests of the chemicals'effects on the cells' genetic material. Comparing BPA and three other chemicals-BPS, or bisphenol S, BPAF, or bisphenol AF, and TBBPA, or tetrabromobisphenol A-they found that BPAF and TBBPA actually caused more damage to cellular genetic material. By providing a cost-effective, efficient screening test for chemical toxicity, the mini-testis model will help inform NIOSH recommendations on how to limit risks to workers potentially exposed to these chemicals." Read more


Sept 9, 2017 Symposium Speaker at IAOMT Meeing: Dental fillings and mercury

Xiaozhong (John) Yu, MD, PhD , presented " Dental Filling Toxicity Fear: A Myth or Actuality-New Insights from Big NHANES Data Analysis" at the 2017 IAOMT Annual Convention in Las Vegas, Nevada.

indhy
indhy


Aug 25, 2017 the 10th Congress on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Sciences (WC10).

The WC10 took take place at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle on August 20-24, 2017. Dr. Yu co-chaired the Session of Models of Developmental and Reproductive Biology and presented "An animal-free in vitro three-dimensional testicular cells co-culture model for evaluating male reproductive toxicants"

indhy
indhy


Oct 4, 2016 Time Magazine introduced our research work on the Dental fillings and Mercury blood level

Sept 27, 2016 UGA News: Dental fillings raise levels of mercury in the body

April 20, 2016 UGA Today: Chemical exposure could lead to obesity

July 16, 2014 Professor Yu wins ARDF Award

Nov 8, 2013 Professor Yu and UGA wins NIOSH Grant to develop in vitro three-dimensional tissue model for toxicity testing